PureSolar™ News

On this page we present news from a variety of sources, attempting to bring well rounded facts from a wide pool of thought.

Almost 20GW of PV will be Installed in Q4 2014

posted Oct 6, 2014, 11:00 AM by Steven B. Reeves   [ updated Oct 6, 2014, 11:08 AM ]

NPD Solarbuzz forecasts 19.5 GW of new PV capacity in the final quarter of 2014, exceeding the entire worldwide deployment for 2010 and pushing global cumulative capacity up to 200 GW! 2014 will have 50 GW of newly installed capacity, largely in China, Japan and the U.S.  These three leading markets will account for 70% of Q4 PV growth, say the NPD analysts, who also expect an upturn in investment in new manufacturing facilities.

Germany, once top of the charts for the most PV installs per year, had clean-energy sources met 27.7% of power demand in the nine months through September, topping coal power production. PV generated 6.8%, feeding 24.2 GW of electricity into the grid on June 6, about the same as 20 nuclear reactors. Germany, Europe’s biggest economy, is shutting down nuclear reactors by 2022 and replacing them with renewables, intending to have 60% renewables online by 2035.

According to GTM Research and SEIA's 'Q2 2014 U.S. Solar Market Insight Report', the U.S. installed 1,133 MW of PV in Q2 2014 (up 21% over Q2 2013), with residential and commercial segments accounting for nearly half. Making the cumulative PV capacity in the US reach nearly 16 GW. GTM Research and SEIA forecast 6.5 GW of PV will be installed in the US in 2014, up 36% over 2013 and more than 3x the market size of just three years ago. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the percentage of installed solar energy grew 418% from 2010-2014, more than quadrupling capacity in only 4 years.

Global PV Industry to Add 100 GW of Capacity a Year by 2018, with c-Si Technology Set to Dominate the Market

posted Mar 25, 2014, 12:46 PM by Steven B. Reeves   [ updated Mar 25, 2014, 12:53 PM ]

It is that time of the year, when industry analyst release a lot of reports and we reiterate what they say in our business plans, websites, and other media. I've followed these reports from a half dozen companies over the last decade, and gave marginal weight to a dozen other sources. You find the good analyst houses that know their stuff and you believe the news - much like following any investment research house. I am continually surprised to see just how close the majority of the reports are after their prediction cycle has passed and we can see the real historical data. It is also good to see that the technology choices we picked as a company are the ones that are succeeding and are predicated to succeed.
The report from Solarbuzz has some nice metrics...
  • Globally the PV market grew by 34% during during 2012 and 2013
  • 37 GW installed worldwide in 2013
  • Between 40 to 46 GW earmarked for 2014
  • PV manufacturing will grow substantially between now & 2018, reaching revenues of more than $200 billion
  • PV module average selling prices (ASPs) will decline moderately over the coming years

By 2018, ASP is predicted to fall to $0.51/W, with system prices to fall year-on-year as well. This will mainly be a result of cost reductions in balance-of-systems components and project developers/installers introducing economy-of-scale improvements into their business models.

U.S. installs 4,750 MW of PV during 2013 - up 41% over 2012 ...

posted Mar 20, 2014, 1:52 PM by Steven B. Reeves

... and nearly fifteen times the amount installed in 2008. There are 12.1 GW of PV operating in the U.S. with 140,000 individual solar installations during 2013 with a total of over 445,000 systems operating today. More solar was installed in the U.S. in the last eighteen months than in the 30 prior years. Solar accounted for 29% of all new electricity generation capacity in 2013, with SEIA forecasting 26% PV installation growth in 2014. WA state ranked 23rd in installs, above Oregon & Minnesota. Residential installs reached 792 MW in 2013, a 60% annual growth rate. Non-Residential reached 1,112 MW and Utility reached 2,847 MW or 58% growth over 2012. Average residential installs are $4.59/W, Non-Residential $3.57/W, and Utility $1.96/W - installed PV prices vary greatly from state to state and project to project.



You can read the official report summary here:
http://www.seia.org/research-resources/solar-market-insight-report-2013-year-review

Other summaries:
http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/news/article/2014/03/us-solar-celebrates-records-in-2013-big-trends-coming-in-2014?page=all
http://www.nacleanenergy.com/articles/17580/us-solar-market-grows-41-has-record-year-in-2013

US Shines Past 10GW PV Installation Mark

posted Jul 11, 2013, 4:02 PM by Steven B. Reeves

The U.S. now has more than 10 gigawatts (GW) of installed solar PV capacity, according to new calculations from NPD SolarBuzz. They are still forecasting a total of 4.3 GW install capacity for this year alone, with the majority of the U.S. solar market realized in the second half of the year, much like we saw in 2012. SolarBuzz expects the market to hit 17 GW by the end of 2014, representing 80 percent growth over 18 months. Worldwide solar PV demand reached 15 GW through the first six months of this year, roughly a 9 percent increase from a year ago, and cumulative solar PV installations are about 116.5 GW. For more read: http://www.solarbuzz.com/news/recent-findings/us-reaches-milestone-10-gigawatt-solar-photovoltaic-capacity-according-npd-sola

PV installs at 723 MW in Q1 2013 - up 33% over Q1 2012

posted Jun 11, 2013, 5:27 PM by Steven B. Reeves

The average residential PV system price fell below $5.00/W, while the average non-residential system price fell below $4.00/W, according to SEIA & Greentech Media's U.S. SOLARMARKET INSIGHT REPORT Q1 2013. PV installs are taking off with solar accounting for 49% of new electric capacity in the US. The residential market grew 53% over Q1 2012 and 11% over Q4 2012. The utility market more than doubled year-over-year, with 24 utility PV projects completed in Q1 2013. The GTM Research/SEIA report predicted "that the next four years will be marked by a new solar revolution in the U.S., this time driven by the distributed generation (DG) market." Residential and commercial solar markets have historically been limited by availability of state and utility-level incentives, solar has now become cost-effective in some markets with only the federal investment tax credit (ITC), accelerated depreciation and net metering.

Global installed PV surpasses 101 GW in 2012

posted Feb 12, 2013, 11:46 AM by Steven B. Reeves   [ updated Feb 12, 2013, 11:59 AM ]

Global installed PV capacity surpassed 101 GW in 2012, according to data published by the European Photovoltaic Industry Association (EPIA). Between 30 and 32 GW was connected to the grid and made operational globally in 2012, roughly the same amount added in 2011- a boom year. In 2012, the top three European PV markets were Germany (7.6 GW), Italy (3.3 GW) and France (1.2 GW). Outside of Europe, the top three markets in 2012 were China (between 3.5 and 4.5 GW), the US (3.2 GW) and Japan (2.5 GW). EPIA will publish the final figures for 2012 in May. Germany and Italy remain the largest solar markets by far in terms of Total Installed Capacity. At the end of 2012, Germany had 32.4 GW of installed PV power and Italy had approximately 16.2 GW.

For news you won't here from the mainstream US 'press' ...
According to the head of Duke Energy Corp.'s renewable-energy development unit
, the U.S. will add more solar power in 2013 than wind energy for the first time. The U.S. added 13.1 gigawatts of wind power last year, beating natural gas for the first time. The U.S. installed about 3.2 gigawatts of solar power last year and may reach 3.9 gigawatts this year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

CTO Invited to Speak to the Entrepreneurship and Power Program

posted Feb 8, 2013, 6:23 PM by Steven B. Reeves

Steve Reeves, CTO of PureSolar, Inc. will be talking to the E&P program at The Evergreen State College on Friday, February 8, from 3-5 pm. He’ll discuss the path to PureSolar, exploring real-world aspects of entrepreneurship. Attendees will walk away understanding the basics of PV systems and the manufacturing of PV modules, as well as key success steps of PureSolar and its history. PureSolar’s product line, customer base and future goals will be uncovered, discussion of the companies competencies and available services. The presentation will show the current manufacturing tools, both hardware and software, and delve into our unique funding methods.

PureSolar – locally manufacturing your energy independence.

Continued Growth in PV

posted Nov 6, 2012, 2:30 PM by Steven B. Reeves   [ updated Nov 8, 2012, 1:33 PM ]

13.2% US solar job growth in the last year - New PV installations in 2012 will grow by around 11% on 2011 to 31GW worldwide

The Solar Foundation (TSF) announced statistics that show despite recent setbacks and reports of layoffs, the U.S. solar industry is expanding at nearly six times that of the overall economy. The report, National Solar Jobs Census 2012, states that 13,872 new jobs have been added by the solar industry in the U.S., bringing the total number 119,016. Compare that with an overall U.S. economy rate of 2.3% and -3.77% for fossil fuel electric generation industry, which lost 3,857 jobs in the same period (coal industry is relatively small, employing just 86,000 people in 2011 - that is less than 0.06% of all US jobs). The report states that manufacturing compromises just under 14% of total jobs, while sales and EPC services rounds up most of the remaining positions. These are distributed clean-energy jobs all over the country.

The U.S. now has enough installed solar capacity to power nearly a million households. Currently, total installed solar capacity in the U.S. adds up to 5.7 gigawatts (5,700 megawatts). By the end of 2012, it is expected that another 3.2 gigawatts will be added, nearly doubling last year’s growth. Estimates indicate that 2013 will see the addition of another 3.9 gigawatts of solar capacity in the U.S.

"Top 20" Commercial Solar Users in the U.S. Might Surprise You

posted Sep 29, 2012, 12:07 AM by Steven B. Reeves   [ updated Sep 29, 2012, 12:33 AM ]

September 2012, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) and the Vote Solar Initiative (Vote Solar) published a report naming the companies using the most solar on their facilities in the U.S. The "Top 20" (in terms of on-site solar capacity deployed) are:  Walmart (WMT), Costco (COST), Kohl’s Department Stores (KSS), IKEA, Macy’s (M), McGraw-Hill (MHP), Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), Staples, Inc. (SPLS), Campbell’s Soup (CPB), Walgreens (WAG), Bed, Bath & Beyond (BBBY), Toys ‘R’ Us (TOY), General Motors (GM), FedEx (FDX), White Rose Foods, Dow Jones (DJ), Snyder’s of Hanover (LNCE), ProLogis (PLD), Hartz Mountain Industries, and Crayola. See the full report at www.seia.org/SolarTop20. The "Top 20" installations generate a combined estimate of $47.3 million worth of electricity each year.

EPIA forecast 2012 - Global Cumulative PV Installs


Other companies that are significant users of solar include Apple, Bloomberg LP, Del Monte Foods, GE, Google, Intel, JC Penny, Kaiser Permanente, Lackland Storage, Lord & Taylor, L’OREAL USA, MARS SNACKFOOD, US Foods LLC, Stop and Shop, Merck, REI, SAS Institute Inc., and Tiffany & CO. “These companies know that solar energy allows them to reliably manage their long-term energy costs and in turn also helps to keep their customer prices low,” said SEIA President and CEO Rhone Resch. “Solar helps these top American companies focus on their core business by reducing overhead costs.”

Clinton to PV Industry

posted Sep 28, 2012, 11:50 PM by Steven B. Reeves   [ updated Feb 15, 2013, 3:32 PM ]

"The United States pays $22 in subsidies to oil, coal, and nuclear power for every $1 invested in renewable energy" - former U.S. president, Bill Clinton, addressing the 2012 Solar Power International trade show. He went on to say "An enormous number of people don’t know that solar is affordable now" and "The U.S. has paid oil subsidies since 1916, (the oil companies) sink dry wells and still get the tax credit.” Even Texas alone employs more clean tech workers than there are coal workers in the entire country.

In getting a grasp of the energy industry, the report “Red White & Green: The True Colors of America’s Clean Tech Jobs", by Nancy Pfund and Michael Lazar reports:
  • “Three states all by themselves each have more clean tech workers than all the coal mining workers in the USA.”
  • “The total number of Americans working in clean tech is many times the size of those in coal.”
  • "Clean tech may mean a debate in Washington, but it means jobs everywhere else.”

So if the key phrase is "Jobs, Jobs, Jobs", then we all should be saying "Clean Tech, Clean Tech, Clean Tech". For PureSolar that would be "PV, PV, PV"!

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